The Eagle has landed…

 

Er, or should I say the falcon has returned? This little guy is one of our series of Egyptian Explorer amulets (all lovingly handcrafted by Herbert staff) which are currently travelling the world. He was released into the wild last August and returned home to roost in December. OK – I’ll stop with the ridiculous puns; you get the point.

Horus the falcon is a Travel Bug. Travel Bugs are trackable items which are moved around the world by geocachers. Geocachers are people who hide and seek containers called geocaches. Geocachers place Travel Bugs into geocaches; another geocacher then takes the Travel Bug and leaves it in another geocache, and so on. The Travel Bugs move from cache to cache to fulfill a goal set by the Travel Bug owner. (If all of this sounds bizarre to you, just think of geocaching as high-tech treasure hunting using a GPS (SatNav) device. You can read all about it and Travel Bugs here: www.geocaching.com.)Tutankhamen's Gold Funerary Mask

Through the kindness of geocaching strangers, Horus here has fulfilled his goal of travelling from Coventry to London to pay his respects to Howard Carter – now a resident of Putney Vale Cemetery. Howard Carter was a foremost British Egyptologist and archaeologist who excavated in Egypt during the early 1900s. He is perhaps most remembered for being the principal archaeologist behind the 1922 discovery of Tutankhamen’s tomb. There is a wealth of information, including scanned pages from Carter’s diary, photographs of the excavation and a database of objects excavated from Tutankhamen’s tomb on the Griffith Institute website.

Horus is the first Travel Bug to return home to the Herbert. At the moment, we have about 30 Travel Bugs in circulation around the world. We are hoping that more will return between now and the close of Secret Egypt in June 2011. While Secret Egypt is here, we will be displaying the Travel Bugs in the museum with journals and photographs of their journeys. Visitors will be able to find out more about their journeys and the influence of Egypt both in Britain and abroad.

Erin
Add to DeliciousAdd to DiggAdd to FaceBookAdd to Google BookmarkAdd to RedditAdd to StumbleUponAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Twitter

Advertisements

Posted on 19/01/2011, in Secret Egypt and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. What a weird and wonderful idea!

    The falcon is really nice. I hope to hear from some of the other bugs as well – it seems like these little fellas all have a story to tell…

    • Thanks for your comment!
      We’ll be posting more about the other bugs when they return. Of course, given how unpredictable they are, there’s no way to know when that will be!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: